Department of Economics at Illinois State University Department of Economics at Illinois State University Department of Economics at Illinois State University

Career-Related Concentrations in Economics

It's never too soon to start thinking about your career goals and planning accordingly. In today's competitive job market it is important to distinguish yourself from your peers. Solid academic performance, involvement in extracurricular activities, and work-related experience are all significant on your résumé. It's also important to get the most from the variety of courses you take in the process of completing your degree requirements.

You need only 31-33 hours of specific courses for an undergraduate degree in Economics, i.e., about 28 percent of the minimum 120 hours needed to graduate from Illinois State University. Consequently, even after accounting for General Education requirements, you have a considerable amount of flexibility with respect to additional courses you might take. We strongly urge you to seriously consider a second major or minor as a way to expand your career possibilities and distinguish yourself from your peers. Approximately 25 percent of the Economics majors at Illinois State are double majors. The list of majors students most frequently combine with their Economics major includes Accounting, Applied Computer Science, Business Administration, Finance, Marketing, and Political Science. Approximately 150 students are currently minoring in Economics. Most of these students are majoring in one of the areas just listed.

Students who are not sure what they want to do once they graduate should nonetheless take courses that preserve a wide range of career options. Given the types of jobs in which undergraduates with a major in Economics traditionally find themselves, we strongly recommend courses in accounting, applied computer science, business administration, finance, marketing, mathematics, and statistics. At a minimum, you should take courses to satisfy the requirements of the major and minimum number of hours for a degree that complement one another.

The description of the Economics major in the Illinois State University Undergraduate Catalog identifies seven specific concentrations students might consider when majoring in Economics. These concentration include Business Economics, Electricity, Natural Gas and Telecommunications Economics, Graduate School Preparation, Human Resources, International Economics, Pre-Law, and Public Policy. Students who want to pursue a career in one of these areas should take as many courses in the relevant concentration as their schedule permits. The following is a more extensive list of concentrations that you might consider, including courses offered by the Economics department and other departments at Illinois State.

Suggested Concentrations for the Undergraduate Major in Economics

Business Economics

Economics Electives

  • ECO 215: Money and Banking
  • ECO 239: Managerial Economics
  • ECO 320: Industrial Organization
  • ECO 339: Organizational Economics

Additional Electives

  • ACC 131: Financial Accounting
  • ACC 132: Managerial Accounting
  • FIL 185: Legal, Ethical and Soc. Env.of Bus.
  • FIL 240: Business Finance
  • FIL 241: Financial Markets
  • ITK 168:

Electricity, Natural Gas and Telecommunications Economics

Economics Electives

  • ECO 235: Telecom. Econ. and Pub. Policy
  • ECO 236: Energy Economics
  • ECO 239: Managerial Economics
  • ECO 320: Industrial Organization
  • ECO 335: Econ.of Regulation and Antitrust
  • ECO 339: Organizational Economics

Additional Electives

  • FIL 240: Business Finance
  • FIL 242: Investments
  • FIL 347: Fin.Futures, Options and Swaps

Graduate School Preparation

Additional Electives

  • ENG 249: Technical and Prof. Writing I
  • MAT 146: Calculus II
  • MAT 147: Calculus III
  • MAT 175: Elementary Linear Algebra
  • MAT 350: Applied Probability Models
  • MAT 351: Statistics and Data Analysis
  • MAT 353: Regression and Time Series Anal.
  • MAT 356: Statistical Computing

Monetary Economics-Finance

Economics Electives

  • ECO 215: Money and Banking
  • ECO 346: International Finance

Additional Electives

  • FIL 240: Business Finance
  • FIL 241: Financial Markets
  • FIL 242: Investments
  • FIL 347: Fin. Futures, Options and Swaps

Human Resources

Economics Electives

  • ECO 225: Labor Economics and Labor Problems
  • ECO 239: Managerial Economics
  • ECO 326: Economics of Human Resources
  • ECO 339:

Additional Electives

  • FIL 313: Labor Law
  • MQM 220: Business Organization and Mgmt
  • MQM 323: Human Resources Management
  • MQM 324: Industrial Relations Management
  • MQM 352: Recruitment and Selection
  • MQM 354: Compensation Management
  • POS 331: Human Resource Management
  • POS 372: Employment Law
  • PSY 230: Business and Industrial Psychology
  • PSY 375 Personnel Psychology
  • SOA 255: Sociology of Work and Occupations
  • SOA 264: Minority Relations

International Economics

Economics Electives

  • ECO 205: Developmental Economics
  • ECO 245: The International Economy
  • ECO 345: International Trade
  • ECO 346: International Finance

Additional Electives

  • INB 190: Introduction to International Business
  • MQM 350: International Management
  • POS 151: Introduction to International Relations
  • Proficiency in a foreign language

Pre-Law

Economics Electives

  • ECO 220: Law and Economics
  • ECO 235: Telecommunications Economics
  • ECO 320: Industrial Organization
  • ECO 335: Economics of Regulation and Antitrust

Additional Electives

  • COM 202: Persuasive Public Speaking
  • ENG 249: Technical and Prof. Writing I
  • ENG 349: Technical and Prof. Writing II
  • FIL 185: Legal, Ethical and Soc. Envir.of Bus.
  • FIL 209: Business Law I
  • FIL 211: Business Law II
  • POS 215: U.S. Judicial Process
  • POS 216: Introduction to Torts
  • POS 283: Trial Advocacy
  • POS 318: Administrative Law
  • POS 325: Const. Law: Functions and Powers
  • POS 326: Constitutional Law: Due Process Rights